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This is the small print where I deny everything and refuse to take any responsibility for anything. Any opinions given should not be taken as facts & any facts given should not be taken as opinions. As an extra precaution all the really small print is in white text, this is copyrighted .


E. & O. E.


Copyright www.petespintpot.co.uk  2008. First published 17 October 2008, last updated  24 October 2017.


Pete’s Pint Pot is dedicated to the home production & sensible drinking of beer, wine, cider & meads plus a little bit of china painting & a few bits of photograph tampering.


If you are affected by any of the articles on this site or any of the issues raised in them, I truly feel very sorry for you.


Finally the sanity clause: As Chico Marx

famously said to brother Groucho,


  “Everybody knows there ain't no

     Sanity Clause!”



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Partial Mashing & Steeping #Home

Annual 2015




          The two processes of partial mashing (or mini-mashing) & steeping are fundamentally the same & both use malt extract as the main fermentable material. The basic idea is to mainly add flavour, body, colour & possibly head retention to the brew, but the subtle difference is that steeping grains have undergone a process in which the cereal starch has already been converted to sugars. In the case of partial mashing, some or all of the grains have unconverted starch & need base malts containing enzymes to convert the starch into fermentable sugars.


Note:- All the grains must be cracked/crushed.


STEEPING


Determine the total weigh of the crushed grain (no sugars/syrups) & place in a muslin or nylon “grain bag” (preferably). Add 3 litres of water per Kg in a suitable pan for boiling twice the amount, raise the temperature to about 65-77°C. Carefully place the bag in the water, ensuring that is completely submerged for about 35-45 mins. & stirring to ensure that no dry pockets exist. Remove the bag & place in a large colander placed over the pan. Heat the same amount of water to a similar temperature. Sparge the grains, filling the brew pot to the correct amount for boiling with the hops. DO NOT squeeze the bag or swill out the grains with too much water as these actions can also cause excessive tannin release. Compost the grains.


This method should give about 35% extract efficiency in your brewing calculations.


Cold steeping can also be used, generally overnight.


In my (extract) recipes, any grains are boiled with the hops, with or without the extract. Some people, especially the Americans, use the partial mash method as temperatures near the 80°C mark, bitter tannin are released. My opinion is, if it’s good enough for Dave Line & Graham Wheeler, it’s definitely good enough for me!


PARTIAL MASHING


Here it is preferable to match the weight of any adjuncts with a similar quantity of  malt. Again, determine the total weigh of the crushed grain & place in a muslin or nylon bag & use 3 litres of water per Kg. Raise the temperature to about 77°C max. (the “strike” temperature). Carefully place the bag in the water, ensuring that is completely submerged for about 45 mins. Mashing needs a temperature of  62-69°C so keep in that range. The lower end of the range will take longer to mash but produces a more complete conversion of the starches to sugars, resulting in a more fermentation & a dryer tasting beer. The upper end of the range will result in less starch conversion leaving a beer with more un-fermentable dextrines, resulting in slightly less fermentation, giving a sweeter tasting brew.


Some base/kilned Malts which may be MASHED ONLY

Some roasted/kilned malts which may be MASHED OR STEEPED

Aromatic

Biscuit

Brown

Melanoidin

Marris Otter Munich

Pale

Pilsner

Rye

Vienna

Victory

Wheat

Black

Carafa Special

Carapils

Caramunich

Caravienna

Chocolate

Crystal

Roasted Barley

Special “B”

PARTIAL MASH RECIPES

PORTER

Pale malt

Malt extract - light

Crystal malt

Chocolate malt

Black malt

Roasted barley

Sugar

Priming sugar g/litre

Goldings (5.3% AA)

Boil vol.

Boil time

1000g

1500g

500g

200g

200g

100g

270g

4.725g (1.5 level 5ml tsp/litre)

76g

10 litres

60 min.


O.G. (Including primer)

O.G. (Excluding primer)

F.G.

Alc. % (Including primer)

Initial volume litres

Bitterness EBU

Colour EBC

Suggested drinking temp. °C

Calc.

1042

1040

1008

4.5

19

42 (for 20% hop utilization)

200+

13-18

RECIPE NOTES:-


The total grain vol. comes to 2Kg (red figures) so we will need 6 litres of mashing water (2Kg x 3 litre/Kg) heated to about 77°C.

Mash the grains as described above, maintaining the temperature between 62-69°C for about 45 mins. After sparging, stir the malt extract (but not the  sugar) & make up to 11.5 litres.

Bring to the boil, add the hops & boil for an hour.

Remove the hops by sparging, add the sugar& make up to 19 litres (the final volume).

Aerate the wort when the temperature falls below 25°C & pitch the yeast.

STEEPING RECIPES

US PALE ALE

Malt extract - light

Crystal malt

Sugar

Priming sugar g/litre

Cascade hops (5.5% AA)

Boil vol.

Boil time

3000g

300g

400g

4.725g (1.5 level 5ml tsp/litre)

60 + 15g (last 15 min.)

14.5 litres

60 min.


O.G. (Including primer)

O.G. (Excluding primer)

F.G.

Alc. % (Including primer)

Initial volume litres

Bitterness EBU

Colour EBC

Suggested drinking temp. °C

Calc.

1050

1048

1009

5.4

23

32 (for 20% hop utilization)

23

8-10

RECIPE NOTES:-


The grain vol. is 0.3Kg (red figure) so we will need 0.9 litres of mashing water (0.3Kg x 3 litre/Kg) heated to about 65-77°C &  leave for 35-45 mins. After sparging, stir the malt extract (but not the sugar) & make up to 14.5 litres (Boil vol.).

Bring to the boil, add the hops & boil for an hour.

Remove the hops by sparging, add the sugar & make up to 23 litres (the final volume).

Aerate the wort when the temperature falls below 25°C & pitch the yeast.


After the grain (crystal malt) steeping/sparging process it is impossible to estimate the gravity with any reasonable accuracy as the whole process is so variable. By adding the malt extract at this stage, any errors tend to be swamped & the effect of the hops can be more accurately predicted.


CREAM ALE

Malt extract - extra light

Pale malt  

Flaked Maize

Sugar

Priming sugar g/litre

Hallertaue (“Pacific” 7.5% AA)

Boil vol.

Boil time

3000g

500g

350g

350g

3.15g 1 level 5ml tsp/litre)

32

15.5 litres

60 min.


O.G. (Including primer)

O.G. (Excluding primer)

F.G.

Alc. % (Including primer)

Initial volume litres

Bitterness EBU

Colour EBC

Suggested drinking temp. °C

Calc.

1051

1050

1010

5.4

23

21 (for 20% hop utilization)

8

9-10

RECIPE NOTES:-


The grain vol. is 0.85Kg (red figure) so we will need 2.55 litres of mashing water (0.85Kg x 3 litre/Kg) heated to about 65-77°C &  leave for 35-45 mins. After sparging, stir the malt extract (but not the  sugar) & make up to 15.5 litres.

Bring to the boil, add the hops & boil for an hour.

Remove the hops by sparging, add the sugar& make up to 23 litres (the final volume).

Aerate the wort when the temperature falls below 25°C & pitch the yeast.


After the grain (crystal malt) steeping/sparging process it is impossible to estimate the gravity with any reasonable accuracy as the whole process is so variable. By adding the malt extract at this stage, any errors tend to be swamped & the affect of the hops can be more accurately predicted.


SCOTTISH 60/- MILD

Malt extract - light

Crystal malt

Black malt

Sugar

Priming sugar g/litre

Whitbread Goldings

  (6.3% AA)

Goldings hops (5.3% AA)

Boil vol.

Boil time

1800g

200g

150g

320g

3.5g (1 level 5ml tsp/litre)

34


6g (last 15 min.)

9 litres

60 min.


O.G. (Including primer)

O.G. (Excluding primer)

F.G.

Alc. % (Including primer)

Initial volume litres

Bitterness EBU

Colour EBC

Suggested drinking temp. °C

Calc.

1032

1031

1005.6

3.5

23

21 (for 20% hop utilization)

50


RECIPE NOTES:-


The grain vol. is 0.35Kg (red figure) so we will need 1.05 litres of mashing water (0.35Kg x 3 litre/Kg) heated to about 65-77°C &  leave for 35-45 mins. After sparging, stir the malt extract (but not the sugar) & make up to 9 litres (Boil vol.).

Bring to the boil, add the hops & boil for an hour.

Remove the hops by sparging, add the sugar & make up to 23 litres (the final volume).

Aerate the wort when the temperature falls below 25°C & pitch the yeast.


After the grain (crystal/black malt) steeping/sparging process it is impossible to estimate the gravity with any reasonable accuracy as the whole process is so variable. By adding the malt extract at this stage, any errors tend to be swamped & the effect of the hops can be more accurately predicted.

Pete’s YoBrew Beer +

Wine & Jam Calculators